Car vs. deer in Minnesota | BrainerdDispatch.com | Brainerd, Minnesota

Car vs. deer in Minnesota

Collisions with deer a common occurrence

Posted: October 3, 2012 - 11:05pm

Which county in Minnesota had the most vehicle and deer collisions between 2009 and 2011?

Here’s a hint. It’s not in outstate Minnesota. It’s a metro county where there may be a smaller deer habitat but many more people behind the wheel. Hennepin County led the state in vehicle/deer crashes from 2009 to 2011 with 508.

The other counties where it pays to keep your eyes peeled for movement from the ditch includes one closer to the lakes area as Sherburne County with 484 car/deer crashes.

The rest of the top 10 for total number of crashes includes: Dakota with 431, Washington with 309, Anoka with 298, Carver with 293, Otter Tail with 260, St. Louis with 240, Stearns with 243, and McLeod with 234.

At the other end of the spectrum, Marshall County in the northwestern corner of the state had just two deer/vehicle crashes during the two-year period from 2009 to 2011. Neighboring county Kittson wasn’t far behind with just four deer/vehicle crashes and smaller but adjacent Pennington County also had just four crashes. And Stevens, Traverse and Swift counties also counted their crashes during the two years on one hand. Both Pope and Red Lake counties had just eight crashes each.

September was the deadliest month on the road in 2012, the Minnesota Department of Public Safety (DPS) reported Wednesday.

Minnesota traffic deaths continue to surge in 2012 after a deadly September when 42 people were killed, according to preliminary reports. September topped August for the deadliest month, when 40 people were killed.

Minnesota motorcyclist fatalities hit 50 for 2012, making this the deadliest year for riders since 2009 when 53 were killed. September tied August as the deadliest month to-date for rider fatalities with 10 deaths. Collisions with deer have been part of the equation.

The DPS urges drivers to look twice for motorcycles and for motorcycle drivers to make themselves visible to other drivers on the road. The department also asks all drivers to keep speeds in check, which is a major player in crashes and severity of injuries, to designate sober drivers. Also advisable is avoiding distractions in order to remain alert to keep an eye out for dangers — including deer.