Stony Brook in Winter | BrainerdDispatch.com | Brainerd, Minnesota

Stony Brook in Winter

Place your tripod on the gravel bottom of Stony Brook for a secure platform to photograph moving water.   Steve Kohls
Steve Kohls
Place your tripod on the gravel bottom of Stony Brook for a secure platform to photograph moving water.

Our area is blessed with lakes and woods but very few places where photographers can photograph moving water showing motion in the winter. 

The exception is Stony Brook in Fritz Loven Park in the City of Lake Shore. With your tripod in hand, head for the rushing water as it tumbles over the rocks in the brook. 

Make sure you have compensated of the white snow by over exposing at least one stop. Slide the tripod carefully into the water and make sure it has a stable base. Your ISO should be dialed down to a very low number such as ISO 200. Place your camera on Shutter Priority and slow the speed down until it starts to show overexposure. 

On a cloudy day it will read approximately 1/8 of a sec f-22. This slow speed will allow the water to move while the shutter is open, causing the "Angel Hair" effect.

The high F-stop will also give you great depth of field for the scene. Remember, release the shutter remotely to keep the movement of the camera down to a minimum.

Have fun and prepare to get wet.